Share This Article:Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

In the last year and a half, we’ve published 11 articles about the GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation) and with its May 25th launch fast approaching, we’ve written a quick summary of each one.

GDPR & Brexit

The UK will begin leaving the EU in Spring of 2019 which means Britain will be subject to the regulation for the better part of a year. Our first article, GDPR and Brexit, was published in January 2017 and explains how the referendum affects UK data privacy.

How to prepare for GDPR

In June 2016, the Close Brothers reported that only 4% of small to medium sized companies (SME) in Britain understood the impact of the GDPR. GDPR: How organisations should be preparing outlines how companies should use awareness, planning, implementation, and training to prepare for the regulation.

Controller or Processor?

There are two types of organizations involved with data transfer under the GDPR; processors and controllers. Each has specific responsibilities with regard to personal data so it’s important to understand how they differ. GDPR: Controller or Processor? Here’s What You Need to Know clearly defines the two.

Regulation for financial services

Financial services manage tons of sensitive content and will likely be under more scrutiny come May 25th. Regulators are expected to keep a close eye on banks, brokerage houses, insurance companies, asset management firms, and others in this space. It’s Tax Time! How Will the Financial Industry Be Affected by the GDPR? outlines the key changes financial institutions should pay close attention to.

The GDPR checklist

By holding companies accountable for the way they handle sensitive information, the GDPR helps ensure that people are safer in the digital world. Our Checklist explores eight important action items to consider before this May’s change.

Responding to breaches

New, stricter regulations require organizations to report data breaches to the relevant supervisory authority and in some cases, to the individuals affected. You’ve Been Breached, What Now? describes different types of data breaches and how organizations should respond under the GDPR.

Cyber insurance

It’s imperative for any company to be able to protect itself financially in the event of a breach. GDPR: Should Your Organization Purchase Cyber Insurance? explains how the right insurance policy can assist businesses facing regulatory enforcement.

The Right to be Forgotten

The GDPR requires companies to find and delete personal data if requested by an EU citizen. GDPR: Don’t Forget The Right to be Forgotten details the circumstances under which EU citizens may request data erasure. The article also explains the importance of maintaining transparency through effective user interfaces.

DPO or no DPO?

A DPO is responsible for ensuring data compliance across an organization and for reporting any noncompliance to relevant authorities. DPO or no DPO? That’s the question defines the duties of a DPO and what to consider when hiring one.

What concerns CIOs

77% of CIOs are concerned about how employees use (or don’t use) the technology they provide to securely share content. Our article, Why GDPR is Keeping CIOs Up at Night explains how CIOs are preparing their organizations for the GDPR and what their priorities are for compliance.

The cost of breaches

The repercussions of inadequate data handling processes can extend further and last longer than a one-time fine. Breaches Are Costing Companies Much More Than Money highlights three recent data breaches. Trust, reputation, and loyalty are all at risk if companies don’t take steps toward preventing a breach and preparing a response.

For more information on how to prepare for the GDPR, visit our GDPR Solution Page